Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase main view
Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase On Side
Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase On Side Two
Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase Closeup Colordrips
Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase Full View
Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase Upside Down
Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase Rim View
Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase Como-Craft Store and Harold Horine
Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase Harold Making Pottery
Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase Frontier Curio Shop
Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase Cover National Geographic Magazine May 1943
Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase Full view of vase
Ozark Pottery

Ozark Vintage Roadside Tourist Pottery Vase

Regular price $ 525.00 $ 0.00 Unit price per
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On May 14, 1931, Harold Horine of Hollister, Missouri, patented his "Apparatus For Making Jars From Concrete" and named his pottery business "Como-Craft." Harold's colorful, decorative pots and vases were sold at his home in Hollister (pictured) and at gas stations and tourist stops in the Ozarks. They were extremely popular then with travelers and with collectors now. Harold said his pottery was "more than a souvenir, a lasting art." Examples were exhibited at the 1939 World's Fair. Production of Como-Craft stopped forever with the advent of World War II when Harold when on active duty in 1942; Harold died in 1985.

The photo of Harold at his wheel is from a copy of the May, 1943 National Geographic Magazine. We've also included a photo of the Frontier Curio Shop in Ozark Acres, Arkansas---an example of the types of tourist stops that sold Harold's wares.

This vase we have for sale measures 12 inches tall and about 10 inches wide at the shoulder with a circumference there of 29 inches. Its round mouth is 6 1/2 inches across. The vase tapers down to a 4 1/2 inch diameter base and weighs a whopping 7 1/2 pounds. It has a 1/2 inch round chip at the base (shown) and some typical crazing of the paint, but is in excellent condition otherwise. It's a great piece of folk art made during America's Great Depression.

>>>Harold Horine also taught his Como-Craft Pottery process to tuberculosis patients at Sunnyslope, outside of Phoenix, Arizona for occupational therapy. The pottery that they made from 1935 to 1939 was called Mission Craft Pottery and provided income for the Mission. Harold also sold the rights to make his pottery to: Ernie Fullerton in Branson, Missouri, who stated he sold his pottery "by the truckload;"
Arthur Minor in the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon, calling his wares "Columbia River Pottery;" and to a maker in Sarasota, Florida, when Harold and his wife vacationed there.

>>>Fun fact: Maude Horine, Harold's wife, was a friend of Rose O'Neill, the creator of the Kewpie doll. O'Neill loved Como-Craft pottery,
owned several pieces and wrote about them in a poem.

PYH 5427

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