1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction Front view full with winder on left side
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction Front view With Winder in Front
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction Turned to right back
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction Full Front View
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction Turned to  Left Back
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction Full Bottom View
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction Showing winder and sticks in front
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction closeup left side
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction closeup left side two
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction showing upper base
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction gray background full view
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction Front base view
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction Showing top nails
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction Winder closeup view
1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction Old info card
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Primping Your Home

1800s Lazy Kate Yarn Holder Mortise and Tenon Construction

Regular price $ 149.00 $ 0.00 Unit price per
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* Antique Item

This handmade, antique yarn winder is known as a lazy kate, named for the servant it was meant to replace, much like a "lazy susan." Lazy kates hold one or more bobbins or spools while yarn is wound from them. The spools sit on rods which allow them to spin.

The person who created this kate could have just made simple, straight top and sides, but instead used decorative curves and angles that made it so much more charming. Its mortise and tenon construction, where a projecting tongue of wood (the tenon) fits into the mortise (a corresponding hole in the opposite piece of wood), is the strongest way to join two pieces of wood. There are also scribe marks (shown) that guided the placement of the various pieces.

Found in Connecticut and made of black maple, the winder stands 12 inches tall on a rectangular base that measures 11 inches by 5 inches. The base has a pencil signed name and the piece also came with a handwritten card which reads "To wind woolen thread on after spinning." (We'll send it along.) There are two removable rods that hold one bobbin. It weighs 1 1/4 pounds and is in every good condition, with a narrow split in the wood of the bottom that runs full-length. It appears stable and does not show on the top of the 1 inch thick plank that forms the base. It displays handsomely, making it an interesting addition to a sewing/craft room and to country/ farmhouse settings.


PYH 4854

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