The Vintage Blog — Collectible

Antique Redware Jug 10 Inch Beehive Shape W. Virginia Circa 1850

Posted by Wayne & Linda Henrich on

The shape of this beehive jug starts out as ovoid below the thick collar of the mouth, then follows a straight line down to the base. This puts the date some decades later than the true ovoid jug; potters began using the beehive shape because it was easier to pack side by side for transporting and quicker to make. 

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Antique Longwy French Faience Pottery Pin Dish

Posted by Wayne & Linda Henrich on

This gorgeous pin dish was made by the Longwy faiencerie in the town of Longwy in the Lorraine area of France. The pottery began firing their pieces in 1801. The works made pottery with other designs but their enameled faience is especially appreciated.Longwy began making this pottery to capitalize on the popularity of cloisonné. Whereas cloisonné uses wire to surround the enameling, Longwy used raised black lines which were then filled in with color by hand after firing, then refired. Sometimes they used as many as twenty-five different colors.This octagonal pin dish is in excellent condition. It measures 3 ¾...

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Antique Japanned Toleware Oval Tray Wonderful Patina

Posted by Wayne & Linda Henrich on

These decorated wares were called tole, derived from the French “tole peinte” which means “painted sheet metal.” 

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Advertising Plate by D.E. McNicol of Kansas

Posted by Wayne & Linda Henrich on

This 7 inch plate was a giveaway by the J.A. Lednicky Stores, which were in Everest, Purcell and Huron, Kansas, all of which is printed in gold at the front bottom. The central motif features a male pheasant in front of a stand of birch trees; at the lower right there is a signature: “Daudin.”

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Gingerbread Heinrich Haeberlein Figural Tin From West Germany

Posted by Wayne & Linda Henrich on

This charming lebkuchen (gingerbread) tin has outstanding lithographed, embossed graphics. It was produced in West Germany by Heinrich Haeberlein in Nuremberg in what was West Germany in the 1980's. On one side are the words "feine nurnberger honig-lebkuchen" which translates to "fine Nuremberg honey gingerbread." On the back under the manufacturers' names It states they are a lebkuchen and chocolate factory. On the other side is the word "Brahvurstglocklein," which is the name of a historic grilled bratwurst restaurant in Nuremberg. We have seen this tin identified as a house, cottage or store, but since it's marked with the name...

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